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Peachtree conversion

I am working with a new client that has their accounting data in Peachtree. According to the QB help menu, in order for me to convert this to QB, I will need Peachtree software and the whole data file on my computer, not just a backup copy of their data from Peachtree.Does anyone have a way around this? I really don't want to purchase a copy of Peachtree for this conversion. I should point out that the person who was handling my clients books is not going to be too cooperative in giving up their software. They will however burn a disk with the backup.Thanks for your help.

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    Your client should be able to send you the entire Peachtree file instead of making you a backup. Or you can do the conversion at the client's office.

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      Carol,
      That's the trouble; my client doesn't have the file, her bookkeeper does.
      I guess what you're saying is that if I get the entire date file (?) then I can convert it into QB?

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        I guess you have two options... Ask the previous accountant for the Peachtree file (not a backup), or have someone else who has Peachtree restore the backup file you have, then send it to you. If you choose that option, I'd be there if I were you to make sure the file gets deleted after it's in your hands. I don't think it would be worth buying Peachtree just to restore one file unless you'll need history at some point.

        Do you have a trial balance for whatever period the prior accountant stopped with? Be sure you have all the info you need to go forward and good luck with the transfer!

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          just a word of caution..I have tried doing a conversion from Peachtree to QB a few times now, and honestly - it just didn't work very well....and I followed ALL the instructions! I think you also have to be pretty familiar with Peachtree (which I admit, I am not!) There is so much data that DOESN'T get transferred!!! In the end, it was actually easier and quicker for me to create a new QB company file...

          Linda E. Freier
          Certified QuickBooks ProAdvisor?
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            Thanks for the advice. I just wish there was a way of knowing how reliable the data will be and how difficult it will be to isolate any problems, before going ahead with it.

            It's not a huge business, with only one employee, but she is a perfectionist in everything so I don't want to give a shred of doubt that the conversion might be suspect and I will therefore need to go on a fishing expedition to isolate any problems.

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              there is a lot of helpful (I won't say USEFUL!) information on the Intuit website about doing a Peachtree conversion,which you probably already know about...including the "Peachtree Conversion tool" and problems to look for...:)

              I think that the next time I have this situation, I might try exporting lists & transactions from peachtree into Excel, then importing them into QuickBooks..

              Linda E. Freier
              Certified QuickBooks ProAdvisor?
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